Sunday, June 15, 2014

"If we have the truth, it cannot be harmed by investigation. If we have not the truth, it ought to be harmed."

"If we have the truth, it cannot be harmed by investigation. If we have not the truth, it ought to be harmed."
-J. Reuben Clark

I'm baffled that some dismiss any effort to ask hard questions in an honest attempt to find out what "the truth" is. In a church that only requires us to believe "truth", why is the default setting to view such attempts that dig deep to find out what the truth is as though it is all "negativity" and a threat?

If one uses a jackhammer to try and separate fact/truth/ideal from the concrete of reality, tradition, and even current teachings assumed to be truth, we should be thankful for such work, not marginalize the worker because of the temporary noise.

1 comment:

Cheri, Mom, Grammie (you pick) said...

This statement is so true and I completely support sincere investigation.
I think that it's the way in which questions, comments, doubts etc. are phrased or expressed, that can cause a negative feeling.
I truly believe there is room for investigation and open consideration regarding the church, it's history and philosophies. Through faith, prayer, discussion and personal revelation we can all find the answers we seek.
However, if one truly wants to find truth, we must be willing and open to all points of view, even if that point of view doesn't result in the answer or sameness the questioner is looking for.
I would engage more in these types of discussions if I wasn't concerned about the judgement of the questioner and I'm certain I'm not alone in this quandary. Feeling that what I may have to say will be dismissed or negated in some way if I don't agree, keeps me very quiet, even though I feel I have much to contribute.